«

»

May 31 2016

Inside the Head of UK Managers – A report from GoodPractice

conversation-799448_1280For May’s recommendation we have chosen GoodPractice’s report on what UK managers are citing as their biggest challenges.  The report is designed to explore what managers are finding challenging at work in order to help L&D professionals understand the support they need as well as providing a template for a learning needs analysis.  The survey summarises the responses from over 500 UK-based managers, from organisations with over 250 employees and was conducted in the autumn of 2015.  You can sign up for a copy of the full report here.

From the findings the toughest changes in order are:

  1. Dealing with resistance to organisational change. (74% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  2. Implementing organisational change. (72% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  3. Managing conflicts. (70% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  4. Influencing the decisions of my peers and senior managers. (66% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  5. Managing capability/performance. (65% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  6. Managing the long-term development of my team.(65% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)
  7. Maintaining a work-life balance. (65% of respondents marked this as very or fairly challenging)

The least challenging are:

  1. Giving constructive feedback. (48% of respondents marked this as not very challenging or not at all challenging)
  2. Motivating my team. (45% of respondents marked this as not very challenging or not at all challenging)
  3. Coaching/training my team. (44% of respondents marked this as not very challenging or not at all challenging)
  4. Managing absence/sickness. (43% of respondents marked this as not very challenging or not at all challenging)
  5. Managing my time. (40% of respondents marked this as not very challenging or not at all challenging)

The report also looked at gender and seniority differences and found that woman marked all tasks as more challenging than their male counterparts.  The authors ask whether this is actually the case or whether female managers have a more accurate picture of how challenging these tasks are?

Managing conflict in particular, was cited as a greater challenge to women with 78% of female respondents scoring it as very or fairly challenging, compared to only 65% of men.  Similarly, influencing decisions of peers and senior managers were items marked more highly by women 73% compared to 65% of men.

In terms of seniority first line managers found influencing decisions of peers and senior mangers more challenging (71%) as opposed to senior managers (60%).  The biggest difference was in managing team members who work remotely.  Senior managers (63%) found this very or fairly challenging, whereas only 39% of lower level managers did so.

Other topics covered by the report include organisational size difference with smaller organisations reporting greater challenges in the following areas:

  • Coaching/training my team. (61% versus 48% found it very or fairly challenging)
  • Giving constructive feedback. (59% versus 44% found it very or fairly challenging)
  • Managing team members who work remotely. (64% versus 44% found it very or fairly challenging)

The study also makes comparisons with previous surveys carried out in 2010 an 2012 and concludes that managing change continues to be ranked as one of the highest ongoing challenges managers in the UK face.  The least appear to be managing my time effectively, managing absence/sickness and motivating and inspiring my team.

The report also covers the 2015 C-Suite survey from McKinsely which found that the best organisational support comes from a blend of in-class training with other learning interventions.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*